Latest News
tickerbg

Carbon Capture

There is more carbon locked up in UK peat soils than in all the trees of Britain and France. It represents 42 per cent of our entire carbon stock. That is why Moorland Association does so much work to protect these valuable peatlands.

Sadly, too much peat has been drained for agriculture with the most serious effects seen in areas such as lowland fens. It has been dug for fuel and planted with dense forestry.

Now more is known about the importance of peat, our members are heavily involved in peatland protection and link with national agencies like Natural England and partnerships for important studies and projects.

The management on grouse moors helps prevent overgrazing, bracken invasion and summer wildfires.  It has largely preserved the carbon locked-up in underlying peat.

However, carbon can leak out from peat, if exposed to the atmosphere or of it becomes dry, and it escapes as the harmful greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. Carbon can also dissolve leading to colour in water.

To make sure it stays locked-up, and create the best conditions for trapping even more carbon, our members have embarked on a number of bare peat vegetation and drain blocking projects.

DSC_0188

Moorland drainage ditches blocked up on grouse moors to help heal the peat and lock up carbon.

They have plugged well over 4000km of moorland drainage ditches to help re-wet bogs and many more are planned. They are also working with peatland restoration partnerships to re-vegetate and re-profile bare and eroding areas, where the vast majority of upland carbon loss is occurring through natural processes.

As 70 per cent of the UK’s drinking water comes from the uplands, this work is important in mitigating the effects of climate change and it helps improve  water quality for millions of people.

MA members are looking at ways to reintroduce the king of carbon capture, Sphagnum moss, on deep peat. This ongoing work is vital and requires innovation, widespread trials and monitoring.

This could potentially achieve climate change targets for the UK set at Kyoto without adverse consequences for land use.

Rewetting peat and improving its function will enable the moors to store more water and reduce the rate of run off, mitigating flooding. Increasing the roughness of the surface with mosses will also help to slow the flow.

Find out more about grouse moor management and flooding.

dog

Did You Know?

75% of of the world’s remaining heather moorland is found in Britain – but this area declined alarmingly over the latter part of the last century. The Moorland Association was set up in 1986 to coordinate the efforts of moorland owners and managers to halt this loss, particularly in England and Wales.

Stay in Touch with Us



Read our News

Chefs go wild about grouse during Great British Game Week Chefs across the UK are giving grouse pride of place during Great British Game Week which starts today. Great British Game Week aims to highlight the best of wild and natural produce from our countryside harvest. Game is not only part of the British heritage but is also a vibrant and a modern addition to […]

Moorland Association statement on Government response to shooting petition Following the publication of the UK Government’s response to a petition calling for an end to driven grouse shooting, the Moorland Association has issued this statement. Amanda Anderson, Director of the Moorland Association, said: “The shooting community understands that shooting activities evoke strong opinions. This latest petition which urges an end to driven grouse shooting […]

Twitter