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Grouse Shooting Economics

In England grouse moor management creates 42,500 work days a year and is responsible for over 1,500 full-time posts. Of these, 700 are directly involved in grouse moor management, with a further 820 jobs in related services and industries.

Keeper staff are employed all year round, irrespective of the season, and additional workers brought in on a casual basis, up to 50 people a day on the bigger moors.

Research has shown that associated spin-offs from grouse shooting in the North of England are worth in excess of £15 million a year, benefitting a raft of rural businesses. These include game dealers, the hospitality industry, equipment suppliers and transport operators, many of them based in some of the most remote areas.

Each year, owners and sporting tenants of our 175 member grouse moors in England and Wales spend a combined total of £52.5 million on land management, 90 percent of which is privately invested.

The majority of this outlay benefits some of the most rural communities in our uplands.

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Did You Know?

75% of Europe’s remaining upland heather moorland is found in the UK – but this area declined alarmingly over the latter part of the last century. The Moorland Association was set up in 1986 to coordinate the efforts of moorland owners and managers to halt this loss, particularly in England and Wales.

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Moorland Association vice-chairman on BBC Radio 4 Today The curlew is one of the UK’s most endangered bird species. Yet it is thriving on grouse moors thanks to skilled land management. Tom Orde-Powlett, Moorland Association vice-chairman and land manager at Bolton Castle estate explains on Radio 4’s Today programme why the curlew is doing so well on heather moorland.

Key scientific reports shine new light on value of heather burning A dossier of new evidence on peatland protection has highlighted a raft of scientific findings that could help shape future conservation of some of the UK’s most iconic landscapes. New research on key issues including carbon storage, water quality, biodiversity and wildfire reveals that conclusions drawn from previous science are now out of date and […]

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